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DISPERSER BLADE MOUNTING

Mounting Configurations

In order to transfer torque from the mix shaft to the blade, manufacturers use a number of configurations:

CENTER BORE ONLY

A round hole is made in the center of the blade. The blade is sandwiched between an upper and lower surface (this could be a shoulder on the shaft and the retaining bolt or a pair of washers or taper plates). As the bolt is tightened it applies pressure to the blade. It is this pressure that transfers torque to the blade. This design is used on none but the smallest blades, 4" and below. Typically found on aftermarket lab shafts and lab equipment.

  • At DisperseTech we use this design for our light-weight lab shafts with blades up to 3" in diameter.
  • DisperseTech LLC
  • Morehouse Cowles
  • Myers Engineering
  • Shar Systems
Blade Mounting with pin holes

CENTER BORE and PIN HOLES

By far this is the most common configuration. A center hole is drilled in the blade. Two (2), three (3), four (4) or more holes (pin holes) are drilled around the center hole. Drive pins extend from a hub or taper plate through the blade and typically extend into a lower plate or washer. Torque is transferred from these pins to the pin holes in the blade. This design is used throughout the horsepower range and blade size range. As blade diameter increases, the distance between pinholes and/or the number of pinholes is increased.

  • Bowers Process Equipment
  • Jaygo Incorporated
  • Morehouse Cowles
  • Myers Engineering
  • Schold Machine Corporation
  • Shar Systems
Blade mount with Keyway

CENTER BORE and KEYWAY

This configuration is primarily promoted by Hockmeyer Equipment Corporation. In this design a keyway is cut into the blade extending from the center bore. The dispersion blade is again sandwiched between a pair of taper plates, which are also keyed. A keyway is also cut into the shaft. Torque is transferred from the shaft through a key to the blade. Typically used through 60 HP with blades up to approximately 18" in diameter.

COMBINATION KEYWAY and PIN HOLES

Unique to Hockmeyer, this design is typically used with machines over 60 HP and blades over 18" diameter, the bore and keyway is supplemented by the addition of 2 or more pin holes.

  • Hockmeyer Equipment Corp.

Mounting Arrangements by Manufacturer

Bowers

Bowers Process Equipment

Bowers produced dispersers in Stratford, Ontario. They make use of a very common design in driving their disperser blades, CENTER BORE and PIN HOLES. Unlike most, they made use of an odd 3 pin holes at 120 degrees. Common bores include

  • 1-1/2" Center Hole and three (3) 3/8" pin holes on a 2-1/4" bolt circle
  • 2-13/16" Center Hole and three (3) 17/32" pin holes on a 4" bolt circle

Morehouse Cowles

Cowles / Morehouse Cowles

Morehouse Cowles manufactures dispersers on the west coast. Their blades are mounted with center hole and pin holes. Some of their common arrangements include:

  • 5/8" center hole ONLY
  • 5/8" center Hole and two (2) 3/8" pinholes on a 2-1/4" bolt circle
  • 5/8" center Hole and four (4) 3/8" pinholes on a 2-1/4" bolt circle
  • 3-9/16" center Hole and four (4) 21/32" pinholes on a 4-1/16" bolt circle

Hockmeyer

Hockmeyer Equipment Corp.

Hockmeyer Equipment Corporation, a disperser manufacturer located in the Carolinas is one of the only manufacturers to use a design consisting of a CENTER BORE and KEYWAY to transfer torque to the blade.The most common of the bore designs for the Hockmeyer Blade include:

  • Lab to 3 HP - 1/2 bore with Keyway
  • 5hp to 7.5 hp - 3/4" bore with keyway
  • 10 to 30 hp - 1-3/8" bore 40 to
  • 60 hp - 2-3/16" Bore
  • 100 hp - 2-3/4" Bore *NOTE -
  • Large HP 2-3/4" Bore may also have (2) 1/2" Pinholes on 8" bolt circle

Jaygo Inc.

Jaygo Incorporated

Jaygo Incorporated is based in the North Jersey Area. Their blades are mounted with a center hole and pinholes.The most common of the bore designs include:

  • 5/8" center Hole and two (2) 9/16" pinholes on a 4" bolt circle

Myers Mixer

Myers Mixers

Myers Mixers has been building since the 1940. Myers also uses a center hole and pin hole arrangement. Their most common bores include:

  • 5/8" Center Hole and two (2) 7/16" pin holes on a 2-3/4" bolt circle
  • 5/8" Center Hole and two (2) 7/16" pin holes on a 3-1/4" bolt circle
  • 5/8" Center Hole and four (4) 7/16" pin holes on a 5" bolt circle
  • 3" Center Hole and four (4) 9/16" pin holes on a 5" bolt circle
  • 3-1/2" Center Hole and four (4) 9/16" pin holes on a 5" bolt circle

Schold

Schold Machine Company

Schold is a Chicago based disperser manufacturer. The most common of the bore designs include:

  • 5/8" Center Hole and two (2) 1/2" pin holes on a 2-1/4" bolt circle
  • 1" Center Hole and two (2) 1/2" pin holes on a 6" bolt circle

Shar

Shar Systems Inc.

Shar manufactures dispersers in Indiana. The most common of the bore designs include:

  • 3/4" Center Hole and two (2) 5/16" pin holes on a 2-1/2" bolt circle
  • 1-3/4" Center Hole and two (2) 5/16" pin holes on a 2-1/2" bolt circle
  • 3/4" Center Hole and two (2) 3/4" pin holes on a 3-1/2" bolt circle

CLEAR DIAMETER: The clear diameter defines a circle at the center of the blade free from obstruction.  It defines the largest reinforcing disk and/or mounting hub that a blade can accommodate.  This is more a property of the blade style rather than the disperser.  It is most important for blade styles with louvers, rings, and inset teeth, including:

  • Constant Shear Impellers
  • CONN Blades
  • D Blades
  • Myers Style Blades

 

Visit our blade shop to view various replacement configurations.

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Blade Mounting Sheet

DisperseTech Blade Mounting Sheets